New York, Brooklyn, Jersey City & the Hoboken Waterfront as they appeared in a Currier & Ives sketch of 1877 (Library of Congress)

The Creation of an Irish Widow: The 33rd New Jersey at Peachtree Creek, 20th July 1864

On the 20th July 1864, the 33rd New Jersey Infantry of the Army of the Cumberland found themselves at Peachtree Creek, outside Atlanta. They were gathered on a hill some ...

The Excelsior Brigade Monument at Gettysburg (Photo: Cory Hartman)

‘Your Likeness Was Buried With Him’: A Letter to An Irish Soldier’s Wife After Gettysburg

The second day of the Battle of Gettysburg was a tough one for New York’s Excelsior Brigade. Although not an ethnic Irish formation, many of the brigade’s regiments- such as ...

Austin, Nevada as it appeared during the King Survey in 1868. 'Rambler' describes the St. Patrick's Day parade here in 1864. This photograph was taken by famed American Civil War photographer (and Irishman) Timothy O'Sullivan (Smithsonian Institution)

‘The Yells of Wild Beasts and Shoshone Indians:’ An Irish Silver Miner in Nevada, 1864

Though the American Civil War was one of the greatest conflicts in the history of Irish people, the vast majority of Irishmen chose not to fight in Union blue or ...

Spotlight

Felix's former comrades of Company D, 61st New York Infantry, as they appeared in the Spring of 1863 (Library of Congress)

‘If You Ever Want To See Him Alive…Come Immediately’: A Race Against Time For An Irish Soldier’s Wife

Felix Mooney was 53-years-old when he enlisted in what became Company D ...
An Taoiseach Enda Kenny with President Barack Obama in The White House (Wikipedia)

American Independence Day: Remembering How Ireland Forgets

Today is the 4th July, Independence Day in the United States. Throughout ...
An example of a Georgia Infantry Regiment (the 4th) in 1861 (Library of Congress)

From Galway to Georgia: B.T. Johnston, Famine Emigrant, Confederate Pensioner

Increasingly many of the personal stories featured on the site are based ...
The Americanist Independent (Keith Harris)

The Americanist Independent- A New Journal of American History

Many of you will be familiar with historian Keith Harris who runs the excellent Keith Harris History blog. A number of months ago I was delighted to hear that Keith was embarking on a new project to produce an online journal, specifically aimed at providing a publishing opportunity to undergraduates, graduate students and independent scholars. […]

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Sarah Jane Cochran: Irish Pensioner of the American Civil War (StoryMap)

Visualizing One Irishwoman’s Experience of the American Civil War Using StoryMap JS

As most of you are aware by now, I am constantly looking at new techniques to visualize the Irish experience of the American Civil War. My latest foray into this area has been with StoryMap JS, a free tool developed by Knightlab at Northwestern University. StoryMap is designed to allow you to tell stories with […]

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Men of the 164th New York, Corcoran's Irish Legion (Library of Congress)

The Forgotten Sixty-Ninth: A Thesis on the 69th New York National Guard Artillery

Although a significant amount has been written about the wartime exploits of the Irish Brigade, particularly between 1861 and 1863, very little ink has been spilt on the other Irish brigade formation- Corcoran’s Irish Legion. This is a serious anomaly given their significance with respect to both Irish-American attitudes towards the Civil War and also […]

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Captain David Power Conyngham while serving with the Irish Brigade (Library of Congress)

150 Years Ago: Dipping Handkerchiefs in the Blood of General Polk

150 years ago today the Confederate Bishop General- Leonidas Polk- a Corps commander in the Army of Tennessee, lost his life when he was struck by a Union shell on Pine Mountain, Georgia during the Atlanta Campaign. David Power Conyngham, a journalist from Corhane, Killenaule, Co. Tipperary, was one of the first Union men to […]

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Union scouts operating in Louisiana in 1864 (Library of Congress)

‘I Hope Soon To Be With You’: The Civil War in Texas and Cork, 1866

We tend to view the surrenders of Robert E. Lee and Joseph E. Johnston in April 1865 as marking the end of the American Civil War, but for many thousands of volunteer Federal soldiers their time in uniform still had many months to run. Even after the official end of the conflict, death could still find these men at […]

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Civil War Times August 2014 (Civil War Times)

An Appearance in Civil War Times Magazine

Each month Professor Susannah Ural of The University of Southern Mississippi runs the ‘Ural on URLs’ feature in Civil War Times magazine, exploring the Civil War on the internet. Many readers of this site will be familiar with Professor Ural’s work through publications such as The Harp and the Eagle and Civil War Citizens. I […]

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Cobb's and Kershaw's Troops Behind the Stone Wall at Fredericksburg, by Allen Christian Redwood c. 1894 (Library of Congress)

Speaking Engagement: Ulster-American Heritage Symposium, Athens, Georgia, June 26-28

I am delighted to announce that I will be speaking as part of the Ulster-American Heritage Symposium, taking place in Athens, Georgia from June 26–28. This is the 20th occurrence of the biennial Symposium and is titled ‘Contacts, Contests, and Contributions: Ulster-Americans in War and Society.’ The event, which takes place in the University of Georgia […]

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The Charge of the 164th New York at Cold Harbor on 3rd June 1864 by Alfred Waud (Library of Congress)

‘God Help Her’: The Emotional Impact of Cold Harbor, 3rd June 1864, On Two Irish Women

150 years ago today one of the bloodiest and costliest assaults of the American Civil War was underway at Cold Harbor. The Union attackers were slaughtered in droves. Few suffered as much as the men of Corcoran’s Irish Legion. Among their brigade were the Zouaves of the 164th New York Infantry, who sustained a staggering 154 […]

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Jefferson Davis shown hanging from a 'Sour Apple Tree' in Harper's Weekly (Library of Congress)

‘Tell Him I Am A Soger’: Lyrics, Loyalty and Family in the Letters of an Irish Brigade Faugh

Patrick Kelly emigrated from Co. Galway to Boston with his parents. In 1861 he enlisted in the 28th Massachusetts Infantry, an Irish regiment that ultimately served in the Irish Brigade. During his service he wrote frequently to his parents at home in Boston; the letters portray a young man who was a lover of music […]

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The post offices in Ireland where US military pensions were being collected in 1883. The points are scaled to highlight areas with multiple pensioners. What is apparent is the coverage of the entire country (Damian Shiels/Palladio)

Visualising the Impact of the American Civil War in Ireland with Palladio

I have been building a database of information relating to the 219 U.S. military pensioners who were recorded as living in Ireland in 1883. These pensioners and their families have been the topic of numerous posts on the site and I hope in the future will form the basis for a book recounting their stories. […]

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