In the second of our posts looking at some of the work of our new Associate Editors Dr Catherine Bateson and Brendan Hamilton, we are sharing some of Brendan’s work and writing. You can find out more regarding Brendan’s background and interests on our About Us page. He is certainly no stranger to readers of Irish in......
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Over the next two posts we will be sharing some of the work of our two new Associate Editors, Dr Catherine Bateson and Brendan Hamilton. You can find out more about Catherine and Brendan on our About Us page. Catherine is a specialist in Irish American service during the conflict, and has a particular expertise......
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The Andersonville Irish Project has now recorded details of 350 Irish Americans who perished at Andersonville during 1864 and 1865. To mark that milestone we have produced an infographic (below, click on the image to enlarge) highlighting some of the main details we have gathered to date. Thanks to the Irish Consulate General of Atlanta,......
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Irish in the American Civil War celebrated its 11th birthday in May. This past decade of running the site has represented both a lot of work and a lot of reward, and I am grateful to everyone who has helped to develop the community over those years and contributed towards the site’s mission. Over the past......
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In the first of what I hope will become a series of posts about Irish Americans who were executed during their Civil War military service, we take a look at documents relating to the story of Private Robert Kerr, an emigrant from Co. Tyrone. Robert was making his living as a drayman in California when......
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The Andersonville Irish Project is continuing apace, and there has also been some good news in terms of funding recently. I am delighted that Andersonville National Historic Site has awarded the Project a POW Research Grant, a fund made available thanks to the generosity of the Friends of Andersonville. In the months to come, as......
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Within the files of Irish Americans who died during the American Civil War, certain engagements crop up again and again. As a general rule, the very worst battlefields of the war for Irish Americans were those that took the greatest toll on New York regiments. More than twice as many Irish Americans served in New......
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In March I had the opportunity to speak to the Irish American Heritage Museum in Albany, New York, about some of my latest research. The talk focused on the experience of Irish Americans around New York’s Capital Region during the conflict, and it gave me an opportunity to discuss some of these men’s correspondence in......
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This is the first in a new series which I have been planning to embark upon for a number of years. The intent is to attempt to explore the scale and range of immigrant service during the Civil War through the medium of a single battlefield. Periodically over the course of the coming months (and......
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One of the aims of the Andersonville Irish Project is to use the men identified within the National Cemetery as a vehicle for exploring the wider social story of 1860s Irish America. Just such an opportunity surrounds the case of Irish immigrant James McMahon, who rests within Grave 1139. James’s death in 1864 played havoc......
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