Posts tagged with: Irish America

When I got the opportunity to undertake some research at Andersonville towards the end of last year I also met up with historian Sheritta Bitikofer of Emerging Civil War. We chatted about a range of Irish-related topics, from my own...
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Back in 2019 I published a feature in History Ireland magazine exploring the importance of the American Civil War in the context of Irish history, and the reasons behind a need to improve on the relative neglect it has suffered...
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The latest update to the Andersonville Irish project has just been uploaded. The database now contains the details of 225 Irish Americans who lost their lives at the Prison Camp- you can access it on the project page here. The...
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This week marks the tenth birthday of the Irish in the American Civil War website. Fittingly it has concided with some recent milestones for the site: surpassing 1,000,000 views, and passing the 1,000,000 published words mark. A decade on from...
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I was recently interviewed by David Cummins, who operates The Irish at War podcast (along with The Irish at War twitter and instagram pages) to discuss the Irish in the American Civil War. My chat with David is the most...
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The latest episode of the Forgotten Irish Podcast explores Irish connections with America’s highest award for gallantry– the Medal of Honor. Since the inception of the Medal during the American Civil War, Irish and Irish American men have been prominent...
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Millions of people in the modern-day United States have some degree of Irish ancestry. The surnames they bear or are connected to display a staggering array of spelling variance–some of which seem very far removed from their Transatlantic origins. While...
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The latest instalment of the series focuses on Alexandria National Cemetery, which I visited on my recent trip to the United States. The majority of burials relate to men who died of illness or injuries in one of Alexandria’s many...
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Popular perceptions of 19th century Irish emigration imagine a tearful farewell from home, as emigrants departed never to be heard from again. But in reality those who left usually maintained close ties with their home communities– ties of obligation and...
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The new post shares another of the brief podcasts that was originally prepared for Irish Community Level Patrons. Here we hear the first-person affidavit of Donegal woman Mary Doherty, who emigrated from Carndonagh, Co. Donegal to Boston in the 1840s....
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