Posts tagged with: Andersonville Irish

The recent dedication of the memorial at Andersonville was a historic event. As well as remembering the impact of the prison on Irish emigrants and their families, it was the first time that an American Civil War related memorial was...
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One of the notable outcomes of our ongoing Andersonville Irish Project is the identification of concentrations of Irish servicemen in non-ethnic regiments, including largely Irish companies. A lot more work is needed on such Irish company level formations, exploring how...
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Recently I joined Fin of the Irish History Podcast to discuss the Andersonville Irish Project and the memorial plaque to the Irish unveiled at Andersonville National Historic Site. The episode is now available through all the usual podcast hosts, and...
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Earlier this week, to mark the major upcoming Irish event at Andersonville National Historic Site we shared the first of our new project infographics, which explored the demographics of the first 850 men we have identified. You can check that...
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I am delighted to be able to share the fantastic news with readers that on Thursday 19th October next a memorial plaque will be unveiled at Andersonville National Historic Site to the memory of the Irish Americans who died there...
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The Andersonville Irish Project has hit another milestone, with 650 Irish Americans now identified who perished at the prison in 1864 and 1865. Many thanks to all those who have contributed and those who have supported the project thus far....
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Owen Moloney was 26-years-old when he was mustered into Company C of the 6th New Jersey Infantry on 7th November 1861. Over the years that followed, the young Co. Clare emigrant saw his fair share of war. He was there...
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When I got the opportunity to undertake some research at Andersonville towards the end of last year I also met up with historian Sheritta Bitikofer of Emerging Civil War. We chatted about a range of Irish-related topics, from my own...
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To the police of Albany, New York, the Small brothers were well-known troublemakers. The two boys, Henry and Stephen, were born in Albany to Irish immigrant parents in the 1840s. Their mother Hannah died when they were little, leaving them...
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I recently had an opportunity to return to the Irish Stew Podcast for a really interesting discussion with show hosts Martin and John. This episode was a four-way conversation that looked not only at our work on the Andersonville Irish...
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