Posts filed under: Women’s History

Private Albert D.J. Cashier served in the ranks of the 95th Illinois from their muster in on 4th September 1862 until they were discharged in August 1865. A member of the regiment’s Company G, he witnessed some hard fighting at...
Read More →
Brian K. Burton’s book Extraordinary Circumstances: The Seven Days Battles makes reference to an account of a fascinating incident that occurred at White Oak Swamp Bridge on 30th June 1862, part of the Peninsula Campaign. The Irish Brigade were positioned here as part...
Read More →
The last post on Irish in the American Civil War brought you part of the story of Bridget Bolen. The Co. Cork native had to petition the U.S. Government for amnesty in 1865 due to her falling within the 13th exception...
Read More →
On 29th May 1865 United States President Andrew Johnson issued an Amnesty Proclamation for those who directly or indirectly participated in the rebellion. However, the amnesty did not cover everyone in the former Confederate States; fourteen exceptions were outlined, and...
Read More →
In New Orleans in 1861, Mary Hill and her brother Sam had an argument. The siblings were close; the emigrants from Dublin lived together, with Sam working as an engineer and Mary as a teacher. As a result of the...
Read More →
Robert McLernon has studied the Irish Brigade for 25 years and has kindly supplied some of his research for this and some future posts. The following extracts refer to an Irish woman who followed the Brigade and most particularly the...
Read More →
8910