Posts filed under: Update

As part of Irish National Heritage Week, Charles Fort in Kinsale is hosting the ‘Calling Them Home’ military reenactment show. Among the main participants are The PARDS, an American Civil War reenactment group from Ireland. The show will run from...
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A new Generals page has been added to the site with brief histories of the 18 Irish-born Generals who served in the Union and Confederate forces during the war. Check out the page and read about James Shields, the man...
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For the month of June Footnote.com is allowing free access to its scanned Civil War documents. This online service provides details such as searchable muster rolls, pension index, widow’s pensions, the 1860 census and a number of other resources, so...
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The Medal of Honor is the highest gallantry award that can be bestowed by the United States. The medal was introduced for naval enlisted men in December 1861, and for army soldiers and non-commissioned officers in July 1862. In March...
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Leopardstown Park Hospital in Dublin is holding a fund-raising Military Vehicle & Re-enactment Show on Saturday and Sunday the 5th and 6th of June. The event, entitled ‘Dad’s Army’ will run from 10.oo to 18.00 and will include Roman, Viking,...
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The Civil War Preservation Trust has released its History Under Siege report, a guide to America’s most endangered and at risk battlefield sites of 2010. I would encourage you to take some time to have a look at the report,...
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Please check out the new ‘Books’ page on the blog. This contains a listing of unit histories, biographies, personal accounts and general histories pertaining to Irish involvement in the American Civil War. Some of the books have also been linked...
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Hello and welcome to this new blog dedicated to exploring Irish involvement in the American Civil War. Although the Irish aspect to the conflict is widely recognised in the United States, it is surprisingly little studied in Ireland itself. This...
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