Posts filed under: Transatlantic Connections

A number of previous posts have explored the impact of loss during the American Civil War on ordinary people in Europe (See Mapping Mainland Europe’s American Civil War Widows). Many of them had never–and would never–set foot in the United...
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James McDevitt was born into a large Irish family around the year 1845. His home was in a small cluster of houses– known as a clachan– which operated an infield and outfield farming system known as rundale (see here). James...
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The new Forgotten Irish Podcast is now live. It is a story that may be familiar to some of you, that of Catherine Garvin and her son Con, which also features as the first chapter of my latest book. In late 1863, details...
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I recently attended the excellent 2018 Famine Summer School held at the National Famine Museum at Strokestown Park House in Co. Roscommon. I was speaking on what pension files can reveal about the remittance of money from America to Ireland, and the...
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On 25 May last I delivered a lecture to the Waterford Archaeological & Historical Society at St. Patrick’s Gateway Centre in Waterford City. The topic was the exploration of the impact of the American Civil War on Irish families. As...
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When the American Civil War broke out in April 1861, Ireland’s Nation newspaper predicted that the lives of Irish emigrants would be “offered in thousands. Many a mother’s heart in Ireland, long cheered by the affectionate and dutiful letter and the generous...
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As part of the new suite of elements forming part of Irish in the American Civil War I am developing an occasional YouTube series exploring relevant topics, interspersed with footage I have taken while at relevant locations. The first in that series takes...
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The Immigration and Ethnic History Society aims to promote the study of the history of immigration to the United States and Canada. Founded in 1965, the Society produces the Journal of American Ethnic History. I have just had a post published...
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New Yorker Marshall Bailey’s moment in the sun came late in life. The summer of 1910 found the elderly American Civil War veteran in dire straits, consigned to life as a pauper far from the country of his birth. His...
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2017 witnessed the 150th anniversary of the 1867 Fenian Rising. Although largely abortive, the events of that year proved inspirational for many in later generations of the nationalist movement. There were a number of events in Ireland to mark the...
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