Posts filed under: Discussion & Debate

Sinead O’Connor has called Paddy’s Lament the “best anti-war song ever made”. Along with the 2002 blockbuster Gangs of New York, this evocative and powerful ballad has arguably had more influence on popular perceptions of Irish involvement in the American...
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I had great fun last week rejoining the guys from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine for one of their lunchtime talks. This time the topic was international pensioners of the American Civil War, where we took a particular...
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On 14 August last I gave an online presentation to the Kenosha Civil War Museum in Wisconsin on the topic of the letters written by Irishmen who served in Midwest units during the American Civil War. Some of the research...
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Earlier this month I gave an online talk for Trasna na Tíre on the Irish in the American Civil War. It discusses the level and form of Irish involvement, the reasons behind their service, and the impact on Irish people...
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Earlier this month I was delighted to be asked to contribute to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine lunchtime Facebook Live series. I spoke with the Museum’s John Lustrea about the Irish experience of the conflict, touching on a...
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In Belfast, Northern Visions TV and historian Barry Sheppard have been partnering up for quite a while to produce the excellent History Now. For anyone interested in Irish history it has become a must watch, given the volume and breadth...
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This week marks the tenth birthday of the Irish in the American Civil War website. Fittingly it has concided with some recent milestones for the site: surpassing 1,000,000 views, and passing the 1,000,000 published words mark. A decade on from...
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I was recently interviewed by David Cummins, who operates The Irish at War podcast (along with The Irish at War twitter and instagram pages) to discuss the Irish in the American Civil War. My chat with David is the most...
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The men who entered the Union military as substitutes from 1863 onwards are among the most neglected and maligned groups associated with the American Civil War. History–and many historians–have overwhelmingly focused on the negative aspects of their service, highlighting their...
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Historically, we have tended to view the Irish American experience of the Civil War through the lens of ethnic formations such as the Irish Brigade and Corcoran’s Irish Legion. Yet of the c. 250,000 ethnic Irishmen who donned Union blue...
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