Brigadier-General Michael Corocoran was one of the most famous Irish Americans of the 19th century. He led the 69th New York State Militia at Bull Run, and in the months of captivity that followed he became a hero of the Union. Upon his release, he formed Corcoran’s Irish Legion, which joined the Irish Brigade as......
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The first months of the newly dawned 20th century found Peter Keefe drawing his final breaths in his rural home of Corloughan, Co. Kilkenny. The 60-year-old had the comfort of his nearest relative Betsy by his side, and the knowledge that he was leaving the world  surrounded by those who knew and loved him. Such......
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I hope that all readers of Irish in the American Civil War enjoyed a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 2020 promises to be a significant one in the history of the site; the month of May will mark the tenth anniversary of the website’s establishment, and it is also this year that sees......
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In 1869 the New York Irish-American Weekly came out on Christmas Day. As with every week’s issue, a portion of the paper was given over to “Information Wanted” advertisements. Most often placed by family and friends, these notices were usually attempts by emigrants to enlist the wider Irish American community in efforts to re-establish contact......
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Amputation, as one historian has noted, is the “symbolic wound” of the American Civil War. One estimate places the number of wartime amputations at 60,000, three-quarters of all the operations undertaken during the conflict. Around 45,000 of these men are thought to have survived. Often regarded as the quintessential symbol of the conflict’s butchery, a......
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In 1865 Ellen McCann of 87 Mulberry Street in New York’s infamous Five Points district went in search of a pension. She was not a typical widow. By the time her husband Francis had elected to join the Union cause she was already 55-years-old, and their children Annie and John were adults. Francis had been......
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As many readers will be aware, I have had a number of “side projects” which I try to advance periodically through the years. One that I haven’t previously highlighted relates to Irish emigrants who lost their lives aboard the USS Maine in 1898. Many of the men who served on the cruiser were Irish emigrants,......
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I spend the majority of time on the site exploring Irish men and women connected to United States military service in America. We sometimes forget that there were some men for whom the reverse was true. In the 18th century, British regiments stationed in America drew native-born men into their ranks, and some from loyalist......
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Beyond a relative handful of individuals such as Thomas Francis Meagher, it is surprising just how little we know about the lives of many senior Irish officers during the American Civil War. The latest guest post illuminates the story of one of the more remarkable. Joseph O’Keeffe was an emigrant from a notable Irish family......
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Among the most intriguing stories of widows and dependents in the Atlantic World are those of the African Americans who moved into Canada having escaped the shackles of slavery. In 1883, one of them was Priscilla Atwood. She made her home in Ontario, but had been born Priscilla Jane Hartsill in Jonesboro, Washington County, Tennessee......
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