All posts by: irishacw

As regular readers will know, Brendan is our resident “photo-sleuth” (among other things!) and regularly makes some fantastic discoveries relating to previously unknown or little-known Irish-related images from the Civil War (and indeed we hope to have some more such...
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The final part of our three-part chat with Harry of Bull Runnings fame on the 69th New York State Militia and the First Battle of Bull Run is now available. If you missed our previous instalments, you can watch Part...
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Last week we brought you Part 1 of our Campfire Chat with Harry Smeltzer of Bull Runnings, examining the origins of the Irish 69th New York State Militia and their road towards the First Battle of Bull Run in 1861....
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For the latest of our Irish American Civil War “Campfire Chats” on YouTube we welcomed long-time friend of the site and expert of all things First Bull Run, Harry Smeltzer. Harry needs little introduction, having maintained the excellent and invaluable...
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As I am on a brief visit back to my former home of Midleton, Co. Cork at present, I thought for our next post we might take a look at some work I have undertaken on local men who served...
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Earlier this year Damian presented an online lecture for Armagh City, Banbridge & Craigavon Borough Council as part of their Rippling Effects of The Great Irish Famine Series. The talk primarily explored the stories of emigrants from around the local...
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The Andersonville Irish Project has hit another milestone, with 650 Irish Americans now identified who perished at the prison in 1864 and 1865. Many thanks to all those who have contributed and those who have supported the project thus far....
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As regular readers of the site will know, I have spent many (maybe too many!) years studying the Widows and Dependents pension files of Irish immigrants. For successful applicants, the most important document they possessed was their Pension Certificate, the...
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Patrick Coffey was a labourer in his 30s when he went to war. In the summer of 1861, he marched off to Virginia as part of Company D, the “Fitzgerald Guard” of the famed 69th New York State Militia. Like...
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Owen Moloney was 26-years-old when he was mustered into Company C of the 6th New Jersey Infantry on 7th November 1861. Over the years that followed, the young Co. Clare emigrant saw his fair share of war. He was there...
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