I recently attended the excellent 2018 Famine Summer School held at the National Famine Museum at Strokestown Park House in Co. Roscommon. I was speaking on what pension files can reveal about the remittance of money from America to Ireland, and the...
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The Irish in the American Civil War website has benefited greatly over the years from the expertise, generosity and friendship of Joe Maghe. Joe is one of the foremost collectors of Irish-associated material from the American Civil War, and dedicates a...
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To accompany the YouTube Channel that has recently been revamped, I am delighted to announce that my new podcast The Forgotten Irish has now also been launched. You can access the podcast via the podcast tab at the top of the page,...
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On 25 May last I delivered a lecture to the Waterford Archaeological & Historical Society at St. Patrick’s Gateway Centre in Waterford City. The topic was the exploration of the impact of the American Civil War on Irish families. As...
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In 1860 one in every four people in New York was of Irish birth. The majority dwelt among the urban poor, congregating in notorious areas such as Manhattan’s Five Points. Their experience of the American Civil War was mixed, ranging...
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When the American Civil War broke out in April 1861, Ireland’s Nation newspaper predicted that the lives of Irish emigrants would be “offered in thousands. Many a mother’s heart in Ireland, long cheered by the affectionate and dutiful letter and the generous...
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The most popular history podcast in Ireland, Irish History Podcast, is currently running a series on the Great Irish Famine. The show’s host, Fin Dwyer, has recently completed an episode that looks at the impact of the Famine on the American...
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As part of the new suite of elements forming part of Irish in the American Civil War I am developing an occasional YouTube series exploring relevant topics, interspersed with footage I have taken while at relevant locations. The first in that series takes...
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Patrick Quilligan from Co. Clare was a 22-year-old tailor when he first took the decision to join the United States Army. The 5 foot 10 1/2 inch Irishman was described as having grey eyes, dark hair and a ruddy complexion...
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Irish in the American Civil War is about to celebrate it’s eighth birthday. As regular readers are aware, the core principal of the site is to bring the story of 19th century Irish emigrants to life and raise awareness of their...
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