Monthly Archives: March 2011

On 10th December 1864, Michael Dougherty made the following entry in his diary: I feel no better. My diary is full; it is too bad, but cannot get any more. Good bye all; I did not think it would hold...
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More Irish born men reached the rank of general in the American Civil War than any other foreign nationality. However, there were many more Irishmen who achieved the rank of Colonel without advancing to a more exalted rank. In the...
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St. Patrick’s Day was an important occasion for all the Irish regiments in the Union Army, and those in the Army of the Potomac were no different. The fighting of 1862 had turned these Irish volunteers into veterans, and many...
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In an update on the previous post regarding the upcoming Fág an Bealach docudrama, Tile Films have kindly passed on the schedule information. For viewers in the United States the two episodes will be airing back to back on Smithsonian Networks...
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Captain Patrick Clooney of the 88th New York, Irish Brigade, was a native of Waterford. He had served with distinction in the Battalion of St. Patrick during the Papal War in 1860, and travelled to the United States in July 1861....
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  The 5th and 6th of March last saw the inaugural 1848 Tricolour Celebration. The green, white and orange flag which would eventually become the national colour of the Republic of Ireland was first flown by Thomas Francis Meagher at...
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By 1864 there was very little popular support remaining in Ireland for the American Civil War. Added to this there was a perception (whether real or imagined) that Federal agents were extremely active in the country, either directly recruiting Irishmen...
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Tile Films are in the final stages of work on their two part docudrama Fág an Bealach (Faugh a Ballagh/Clear The Way) which focuses on the Irish Brigade. Each programme is 52 minutes in length and has been prepared for TG4...
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The morning of 7th November 1861 found the men of the 2nd Tennessee Volunteer Infantry* in camp around the town of Columbus, Kentucky, on the east bank of the Mississippi. Their gaze, along with the majority of Major-General Leonidas Polk’s Confederate...
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Irish in the American Civil War has been shortlisted in the Best Arts & Culture Blog category for the 2011 Irish Blog Awards. There are a number of other excellent blogs in the section and it is a great honour...
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