Tag Archives: Tennessee
The Squire Bottom House, Perryville. The 5th Confederate and 10th Ohio were engaged near here (Photo: Hal Jespersen)

The Irish at Perryville: The 5th Confederate and 10th Ohio at the Squire Bottom Farm

The Battle of Perryville, Kentucky was the ‘high water mark’ of the Confederacy in the Western Theater. On 8th October 1862 Braxton Bragg’s Confederate Army of the Mississippi smashed into elements of Don Carlos Buell’s Union Army of the Ohio (mainly the I Corps), bringing on some of the most savage and confused fighting of […]

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Battle of Shiloh (Chromolithograph by Thure de Thulstrup, 1888)

James Wall Scully’s Unpublished Battle of Shiloh Letters

A recent post provided by Anthony McCan highlighted some previously unpublished letters from Kilkenny native James Wall Scully which related to the Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky. Anthony has kindly passed on another series of unpublished Scully letters which were written around the time of the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee in April 1862. Having served […]

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Private William Haberlin

Portrait of an Irish Soldier

The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Online Catalog offers access to a large number of Civil War related images. Among them is this hand-coloured ambrotype of a Civil War soldier. It is identified as Private William Haberlin, a native of Ireland who was killed at the Battle of Nashville, Tennessee on 16th December 1864. He […]

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Colonel Michael Magevney 154th Tennessee

Irish Colonels: Michael Magevney Jr., 154th Tennessee Infantry

More Irish born men reached the rank of general in the American Civil War than any other foreign nationality. However, there were many more Irishmen who achieved the rank of Colonel without advancing to a more exalted rank. In the first in a new series on Irish in the American Civil War we will be exploring […]

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Battle of Belmont

‘They Bore Themselves As Veterans’: The 2nd Tennessee at Belmont

The morning of 7th November 1861 found the men of the 2nd Tennessee Volunteer Infantry* in camp around the town of Columbus, Kentucky, on the east bank of the Mississippi. Their gaze, along with the majority of Major-General Leonidas Polk’s Confederate force, was drawn to the scenes then unfolding across the river at Belmont, Missouri. A […]

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Cleburne Park, Franklin, Tennessee. The site where Patrick Cleburne was killed, exceptional efforts led to the restoration of this part of the battlefield, formerly the site of a Pizza Hut

The Death of Major-General Patrick Cleburne

In the early afternoon of 30th November 1864 Brigadier-General Daniel C. Govan stood with his Division Commander Major-General Patrick Cleburne on Winstead Hill, Tennessee. As they prepared their troops for an attack on the fortified Federal positions around the town of Franklin, Govan looked out across the exposed plain over which the Army of Tennessee […]

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Corporal Robert Coleman, the man who shot General McPherson

Memphis Irishmen at Chickamauga

The 5th Confederate Infantry were a unit formed mainly from the Irish of Memphis. They were created in May 1862 as a result of the consolidation of the 2nd (Knox-Walker’s) Tennessee Infantry and the 21st Tennessee Infantry, following the Battle of Shiloh. In 1863 they were temporarily consolidated with the 3rd Confederate Infantry (which also […]

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CWPT Report on Most Endangered Battlefields

The Civil War Preservation Trust has released its History Under Siege report, a guide to America’s most endangered and at risk battlefield sites of 2010. I would encourage you to take some time to have a look at the report, and to support the CWPT’s efforts if possible. A wide range of sites are threatened, […]

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Major Person, 5th Confederate Regiment

A Long-lived Confederate Irishman

The October 1909 issue of the Confederate Veteran tells the story of Tommy Campbell, and Irishman who had been discharged from the largely Irish 5th Confederate Infantry Regiment in 1862 as overage. This proved to be a very poor decision, as the original article (below) indicates; Tommy was still alive and well in Tennessee 47 […]

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