Tag Archives: New York
Father Corby at Gettysburg (Memoirs of Chaplain Life)

Irish Examiner Feature: Remembering the Irish Lost at Gettysburg

As many regular readers of the site will know I have been campaigning for some time (along with colleagues) to see greater recognition in Ireland of the cost of the American Civil War to the Irish community. It was the second biggest conflict in terms of numbers in which Irishmen served in uniform, yet we […]

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Some of the dead of the American Civil War (Library of Congress)

‘Information Wanted’: The Irish Missing and Disappeared of the Civil War

Newspapers that appealed to emigrant populations like the New York Irish-American often ran ‘Information Wanted’ sections, where people could place classified ads. Many are attempts to locate long-lost family, friends or beneficiaries of wills. These advertisements ran for three issues at the cost of $1. Some provide a window into the affect the war had on many […]

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The Grand Requiem Mass held in St. Patrick's Cathedral to honour the dead of the Irish Brigade (Library of Congress)

The Dead of the Irish Brigade: The Music and Message, 16th January 1863

On 13th December 1862 the Irish Brigade had fought at Fredericksburg. Along with many other Union brigades they suffered horrendous casualties in the futile attempt to assault the Confederate positions at Marye’s Heights. The losses sent shockwaves through the Irish-American community. Even as some of the mortally wounded lay dying, it was decided something must […]

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TThe 42nd New York 'Tammany Regiment' memorial at Gettysburg. Of the 182 men who contributed to the Irish Relief Fund only two months before, 13 would die as a result of this battle (Photo: J. Stephen Conn)

The 42nd New York Infantry and ‘The Relief of the Destitute Poor of Our Native Land’

The ‘green-flag’ units were not the only Union regiments to contain large numbers of Irish within their ranks. Many others contained a substantial contingent of Irishmen, who were just as concerned with affairs amongst their community and at home in Ireland. One such outfit was the 42nd New York Infantry, known as ‘The Tammany Regiment.’ […]

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Battle of Williamsburg, 5th May 1862 (Kurz and Allison, 1893)

‘Allow Me to Mingle My Tears’: The Aftermath of a 22-Year-Old Irishman’s Death

On 5th May 1862, Kerryman Lieutenant Patrick Henry Hayes led Company G of the 37th New York ‘Irish Rifles’ into action at Williamsburg, Virginia. As they charged toward the enemy, Patrick and his men also had to contend with nature; a severe rainstorm hampered their progress through a dense pine forest, which was littered with […]

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Patrick J. Condon, 2nd New York State Militia and later Captain of Company G, 63rd New York, Irish Brigade. Born in Creeves, Co. Limerick. (Kane 2002: 118)

Face to Face with the Fenians: Mugshots of American Civil War Veterans, Part 2

Part 1 of this series examined the mugshots of ten American Civil War veterans, arrested in Ireland in 1866 for their involvement with the Fenian movement. This post looks at a further ten of these men whose photographs were taken in Mountjoy Prison that year. They form a part of the series of Fenian mugshots […]

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An 1862 Harper's Weekly engraving of captured blockade runners: The 'Circassian' is in the right foreground (Naval History and Heritage Command)

Appeal: The Blockade Runner Minna and The Malcomsons of Co. Waterford

One of the roles of the Irish in the American Civil War site is to assist researchers exploring different aspects of the Irish experience of the conflict. To that end James Doherty, of  Waterford Civil War Veterans and a founder of The 1848 Tricolour Celebration is seeking information relating to the Confederate Blockade Runner Minna, which had […]

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Colonel Michael Kerwin, 13th Pennsylvania Cavalry, in later life

Irish Colonels: Michael Kerwin, 13th Pennsylvania Cavalry

Michael Kerwin was born in Co. Wexford on 15th August 1837. He emigrated with his parents to the United States at the age of 10, settling in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. There he was educated in a private academy and trained as a lithographic printer. In his spare time he spent a number of years involved with […]

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Soldiers & Chiefs Exhibition National Museum of Ireland, with display inspired by the Lieutenant McCarthy letter

‘I Feel Like I’m Deserted’: The Impact of One Soldier’s Death in Corcoran’s Irish Legion

On 8th September 1864, First Lieutenant Patrick McCarthy of Company C, 182nd New York Infantry (69th New York National Guard), sat down to write a letter to the father of one of his comrades. The young man found himself with the unpleasant task of providing the family with details of their son’s death. Two weeks […]

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Private James Allen, 16th New York Infantry

Medal of Honor: Private James Allen, 16th New York Infantry

On 24th April 1861, 17 year-old James Allen enlisted in the army at Potsdam, New York. Joining Company F of the 16th New York Infantry, he would see action in all the major battles of the Army of the Potomac from Bull Run to Chancellorsville. He was discharged at the end of his term on […]

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