Tag Archives: New York Irish
Underground lodgings for the poor of New York around 1869. Many people who ultimately ended up in Poor Houses would have been familiar with such scenes (Library of Congress)

Dependents: Portraits of 50 Irish People in New York Poorhouses, 1861-1865

On 4th August 1865, an Irish emigrant woman from Cork City gave birth to a baby girl in New York. The child -Mary- had been dealt a tough start to life. Her mother was a pauper, and Mary had entered the world in Richmond County Poor House. Mary’s brother and sister were also paupers, and […]

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The first page of William Duffie's Letter to Ann Scanlan, informing her of her husband Patrick's death (Fold3)

‘I Hope…To See You Once More And Then I Would Die Contented': An Irish Mother Writes to Her Son

Bridget Burns married her husband William in Ireland on 18th August 1840. When her husband died eight years later, he left Bridget a widow and their only child, Henry, fatherless at the age of six. By the time 1861 came along, Bridget and her son were living 125 Greenwich Avenue, New York. On 19th August […]

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The % percentage breakdown by birthplace of the men in Thomas Francis Meagher Post #88. Ireland dominates with 18, followed by the United States by 16. The other countries were England (6), Germany (4), France (1) and Unknown (1). (Click on image for larger view)

A Visual Look at Irish Veterans in the G.A.R.: Thomas Francis Meagher Post #88, Staten Island (1)

The Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) was a Union veteran organisation originally founded in 1866. It would eventually become a significant lobby group with major political clout, particularly when it came to veterans affairs. In the State of New York, a number of G.A.R. Posts bore the names of Irishmen who served in the […]

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Staten Island and the Narrows c. 1861 (Library of Congress)

Remembering James Sharkey: The Final Letters of an Irish-American Boy

As regular readers of the blog will know, I spend a lot of time looking through Civil War Widow’s & Dependent’s Pension Files. Many of these files contain original letters written home by soldiers during the war. Having spent a number of months compiling a database of Irish-American letters from men in New York regiments, […]

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The first page of the 170th New York Infantry Bounty List of October 1862 (Copyright: Joe Maghe Collection)

Witnesses to History: A Bounty List of the 170th New York, Corcoran’s Irish Legion

This is the first in a new series of posts on the site which seeks to tie surviving American Civil War objects to the stories of those people associated with them. Surviving objects from the Civil War era are tangible links to the past- they served as ‘witnesses to history.’ I have long been fascinated by the […]

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Union scouts operating in Louisiana in 1864 (Library of Congress)

‘I Hope Soon To Be With You': The Civil War in Texas and Cork, 1866

We tend to view the surrenders of Robert E. Lee and Joseph E. Johnston in April 1865 as marking the end of the American Civil War, but for many thousands of volunteer Federal soldiers their time in uniform still had many months to run. Even after the official end of the conflict, death could still find these men at […]

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Officers of the 63rd New York Infantry with their Colors. This image was likely taken in late 1863/ early 1864 (Library of Congress)

Bowld Soldier Boys: The Return of Irish Brigade Veterans to New York, January 1864

150 years ago, as 1864 dawned, the veteran volunteers of the Irish Brigade came home to New York. These men had come through some of the toughest battles of the war but had taken the decision to carry on the fight. Some were motivated by a desire to see the conflict out, while others were […]

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An Example of the 'Information Wanted' Section in the New York Irish-American. This issue includes the ad placed by John Granfield's Mother. (Genealogy-Bank)

‘Any Information Will Be Most Thankfully Received by His Mother': Tracing Missing Irishmen in 1860s New York

Every week in the New York Irish-American a series of advertisements were run under the heading ‘Information Wanted.’ For $1 you could place a few carefully chosen lines in three issues of the paper, in the hope of finding a loved one. I find these ads some of the most emotive and powerful records of the […]

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The scars recorded on New York Irishmen who enlisted in the Union Navy, July 1863- Click to Enlarge (Sara Nylund)

Scarred Men: The Disfigurements of New York Irishmen, 1863

The first post relating to my work on the New York Irishmen who enlisted in the Union navy in July 1863 looked at their tattoos. However, the marks on their body that they had not chosen for themselves were far more prevalent. Of the 319 Irish recorded as signing on that month, at least 131 […]

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