Tag Archives: National Archives
Separation. Many Irish families could not afford to emigrate together. For whatever reason, all three of these women's husbands left their family home for America, never to return (Library of Congress)

‘The Hard Industry of My Own Hands': Three American Civil War Widows in Ireland Struggle to Survive

On the face of things, Irishwomen Honora Cleary, Eleanor Hogg and Maria Sheppel had little in common. For a start, they were from different parts of Ireland; Honora hailed from Cappoquin, Co. Waterford, Eleanor lived in Boyle, Co. Roscommon and Maria had grown up in Ballinasloe, Co. Galway. Neither did the women share the same religion; Honora and Eleanor were […]

Continue Reading
New York, Brooklyn, Jersey City & the Hoboken Waterfront as they appeared in a Currier & Ives sketch of 1877 (Library of Congress)

The Creation of an Irish Widow: The 33rd New Jersey at Peachtree Creek, 20th July 1864

On the 20th July 1864, the 33rd New Jersey Infantry of the Army of the Cumberland found themselves at Peachtree Creek, outside Atlanta. They were gathered on a hill some 300 yards in front of the main Union position acting as an outpost for their brigade. Their divisional commander, John White Geary, thought attack unlikely. He […]

Continue Reading
Civil War Times August 2014 (Civil War Times)

An Appearance in Civil War Times Magazine

Each month Professor Susannah Ural of The University of Southern Mississippi runs the ‘Ural on URLs’ feature in Civil War Times magazine, exploring the Civil War on the internet. Many readers of this site will be familiar with Professor Ural’s work through publications such as The Harp and the Eagle and Civil War Citizens. I […]

Continue Reading
Private Barney McAvoy, 154th New York Infantry (Library of Congress image, with thanks to Mark Dunkelman for providing a copy)

Senior Citizen Soldier: Private Barney McAvoy, 154th New York Infantry

Much attention is rightly given to those boy soldiers who lied about their age to participate in conflicts such as the American Civil War. However, they were not the only individuals who provided false information to take up arms between 1861 and 1865. For some, it was the fact that they exceeded the age limit […]

Continue Reading
Header Image

Where Did Your Civil War Ancestor Live?

In the second Internet Resources post, we look at the only source of detailed information on where people lived in mid-nineteenth century Ireland, Griffith’s Valuation, which was compiled between 1847 and 1864. A series of unfortunate events has led to the destruction of virtually all of our census information for Ireland in the 1800s; the […]

Continue Reading
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,457 other followers