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The Arthur B. Cohn House in Houston. Built in 1905, it incorporated elements of the earlier Browne family home and was originally built on land owned by Winnifred Browne (Ed Uthman)

John Browne of Ballylanders, Co. Limerick: Confederate Veteran, Mayor of Houston, Texas

On 19th August 1941 John T. Browne died in Houston, Texas, having led a most remarkable life. He had been born in Co. Limerick 96 years before and had become one of Ireland’s many Famine emigrants. In his youth he had seen Sam Houston speak, served in the Confederate Army, and eventually embarked on a […]

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The Battle of Chancellorsville (Kurz and Allison)

150 Years Ago: The Human Cost of Chancellorsville for two Irish Women

On 2nd May 1863, 150 years ago, hordes of Confederate troops appeared as if from nowhere and descended on the unsuspecting Yankees of the Eleventh Corps in the Virginia Wilderness. The blow Stonewall Jackson’s Rebels delivered to the Federal flank during the Battle of Chancellorsville is remembered as one of the most famous and brilliant actions of […]

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The September/October 2012 issue of History Ireland Magazine, produced by Wordwell

An Appearance in History Ireland Magazine

While I was working as part of the curatorial team that developed the Soldiers & Chiefs Military History exhibition in the National Museum of Ireland I had the good fortune to be heavily involved in the identification and acquisition of items for the American Civil War gallery. Among the objects we secured on loan was […]

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Jeremiah O'Brien- the last Irish born veteran of the American Civil War? (Photo: Shan Murphy, Find A Grave)

Jeremiah O’Brien: The Last Irish Veteran of the American Civil War?

In 1950 Harry S. Truman was the President of the United States. The greatest conflict the world had ever seen had drawn to a conclusion over five years previously, and the Korean War was about to begin. By 1950 the American Civil War had been over for 89 years- by the end of the decade […]

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John Dooley's Civil War

Book Review: John Dooley’s Civil War

Richmond native John Dooley served in the First Virginia Infantry Regiment between 1862 and 1865. The Dooleys were one of the South’s most prominent Irish-American families, and counted figures such as John Mitchel amongst their family friends. Both during and after the conflict John Dooley recorded his experiences in the Confederate army, offering an insight […]

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A Field Hospital after the Battle of Savage Station, 1862 (Library of Congress)

Nurse Mary McCoy, The Battle of Fair Oaks and a ‘Tin Dipper’ for President Lincoln

As the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Fair Oaks approaches, it is interesting to note the contribution of one Irish woman to the battle, which was remembered long after the war. New York newspapers in 1899 carried the obituary of a clearly remarkable woman, who deserves to be better known amongst those Irish who […]

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The Sarah Bell Field in Shiloh, across which the 154th (Senior) Tennessee Infantry advanced

‘His Soul Escaped to the Bosom of His Maker': A Limerick Man at the Battle of Shiloh

150 years ago today, Captain Michael Magevney Jr. and his company were positioned near Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee. The Fermanagh native commanded the ‘Jackson Guards’, a largely Irish unit which formed Company C of the 154th (Senior) Tennessee Infantry. Nearby, 25-year-old James Real from Oola, Co. Limerick, proudly gripped the flag of the regiment. The previous […]

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Tait Clothing Factory

Peter Tait’s Limerick

The Confederate uniforms produced in Limerick and shipped through the Union blockade have been the subject of a previous post on Irish in the American Civil War. The remains of the factory are still visible in Limerick today, and its owner Sir Peter Tait’s memory lives on through one of the city’s most recognisable monuments.

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Sir Peter Taits Factory, Limerick

Clothing the Confederacy: Taits of Limerick

The remarkable story of the Confederate uniforms made in Limerick and shipped to the South through the Federal Blockade. Sir Peter Tait was born in Scotland in 1828, but moved to Limerick at a young age. In 1844 he obtained a job working as a shop assistant in the Cumine and Mitchell department store.  However, […]

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