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The Columbian Hospital where George Ridgway died (Library of Congress)

The Long Arm of War: The Impact of the American Civil War On A Dublin City Family

We have a tendency to view the American Civil War as a conflict that impacted only the United States and only people who lived there. This was not always true. The long arm of war could be felt with violent effect across oceans and continents. Some of those who had their lives changed utterly by […]

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Civil War Pensioner O.D. Kinsman in 1920, who Worked in the Pension Bureau (Library of Congress)

U.S. Military Pensioners in 19th Century Ireland: A Listing and Appeal

I have been spending an increasing amount of time looking at the records of U.S. military pensioners who lived in Ireland. Of the c. 170,000 Irish who fought in the American Civil War, only a relative handful ever returned to the country of their birth. The 1883 List of Pensioners on the Roll records a […]

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An Infographic of Irish Involvement in American Civil War

An Infographic of Irish Involvement in the American Civil War

As part of the teaching process with Masters students in University College Cork’s Digital Arts and Humanities Programme I have been exploring the world of infographics and their potential to communicate information in an attractive and easy to digest manner. For those of us without substantial graphic design or software skills there are a number […]

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The SS Doric, the ship on which Patrick Ferris crossed the Atlantic (Image via InstaDerek)

‘The Old Man of the Sea': The White Star Line’s Oldest Passenger?

In 1925 newspapers on both sides of the Atlantic carried the story of the ‘Old Man of the Sea’. about a Corkman travelling back from the United States to live with his sister in Newport, Wales. He was thought to be the oldest man ever to make the journey on the White Star Line- he […]

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Union Veteran Orlando Learned shows a flag he obtained at Vicksburg to his Great-Grandson, 1931 (Library of Congress)

The Last Union Irish Veterans of the American Civil War

The site has previously looked at Limerick man Jeremiah O’Brien, the last known Irish veteran of the American Civil War who died in 1950. He had served as a Confederate, but many thousands of Irishmen who served the Union also lived into the Twentieth century. I have spent some time looking for candidates for the […]

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An Example of the 'Information Wanted' Section in the New York Irish-American. This issue includes the ad placed by John Granfield's Mother. (Genealogy-Bank)

‘Any Information Will Be Most Thankfully Received by His Mother': Tracing Missing Irishmen in 1860s New York

Every week in the New York Irish-American a series of advertisements were run under the heading ‘Information Wanted.’ For $1 you could place a few carefully chosen lines in three issues of the paper, in the hope of finding a loved one. I find these ads some of the most emotive and powerful records of the […]

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The Irish Brigade at Chancellorsville, New York 'Irish World', 1903

An Image of Union Donors to the 1863 Irish Relief Fund, Forty Years On

Regular readers of the blog will be familiar with the donations made by hundreds of Union troops in 1863 towards the relief of the suffering poor in Ireland (see here, here, here and an overview here). These men were about to embark on campaigns that would leave many dead, maimed or captured. Despite this they […]

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The Irish in the American Civil War (History Press Ireland)

Some Reflections On Three Years Writing ‘Irish in the American Civil War’

This past weekend marked the third anniversary of the Irish in the American Civil War blog. Sincerest thanks to all of you who have read articles on the site over that time, to those who have taken the time to comment, contribute and share your knowledge, and also to those who have contributed guest posts. […]

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Some of the dead of the American Civil War (Library of Congress)

‘Information Wanted': The Irish Missing and Disappeared of the Civil War

Newspapers that appealed to emigrant populations like the New York Irish-American often ran ‘Information Wanted’ sections, where people could place classified ads. Many are attempts to locate long-lost family, friends or beneficiaries of wills. These advertisements ran for three issues at the cost of $1. Some provide a window into the affect the war had on many […]

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Thousands of military personnel gave funds to assist the destitute poor of Ireland during the American Civil War (Image via Wikipedia)

Naming Over 800 Union Soldiers Who Supported the Poor of Ireland

A previous post examined the large sums of money that were collected from Union military personnel in 1862 and 1863 for the relief of the poor in Ireland. Despite the horrors of the ongoing war, the potential crisis in Ireland saw Irish Relief Funds emerge across the war-stricken North. Thousands of men in uniform took […]

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