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The Excelsior Brigade Monument at Gettysburg (Photo: Cory Hartman)

‘Your Likeness Was Buried With Him': A Letter to An Irish Soldier’s Wife After Gettysburg

The second day of the Battle of Gettysburg was a tough one for New York’s Excelsior Brigade. Although not an ethnic Irish formation, many of the brigade’s regiments- such as the 70th New York Infantry- had large contingents of Irishmen in their ranks. The 2nd July at Gettysburg left many of these men dead. In […]

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The area of Pickett's Charge, Gettysburg (Wikipedia)

In Search of Willie: Seeking John Mitchel’s Son After Pickett’s Charge

John Mitchel was an Irish revolutionary who had been deported to Van Diemen’s Land in 1848. He escaped to America in 1853 and settled initially in New York. Mitchel found himself increasingly disillusioned with the form of capitalism he felt was being practised in the Northern States, where large numbers of people lived in poverty. […]

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Father Corby at Gettysburg (Memoirs of Chaplain Life)

Irish Examiner Feature: Remembering the Irish Lost at Gettysburg

As many regular readers of the site will know I have been campaigning for some time (along with colleagues) to see greater recognition in Ireland of the cost of the American Civil War to the Irish community. It was the second biggest conflict in terms of numbers in which Irishmen served in uniform, yet we […]

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Federal Soldier Disembowelled by a Shell, Rose Woods, near The Wheatfield (Library of Congress)

Reporting the Gettysburg Casualties of the 63rd New York, Irish Brigade

The Irish Brigade went into action at Gettysburg on 2nd July 1863. They did their fighting in the Wheatfield, one of the most infamous sections of the battlefield. The already depleted brigade suffered some 200 casualties. One of  the brigade’s regiments that fought at Gettysburg was the 63rd New York Infantry. On 6th July the […]

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42nd New York Memorial at Gettysburg (Photo:Piotrus)

Fenian Casualties at Gettysburg

Following the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863, communities all over the North and South counted the cost of the three-day struggle which had taken the lives of over 7,000 men. One of the more unusual groups to be affected by the engagement were the Fenian Brotherhood, an organisation committed to securing Ireland’s freedom from […]

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Monument of the 73rd New York Infantry at Gettysburg, erected in 1897 and depicting a Union infantryman and a fireman side by side (Final Report on the Battlefield of Gettysburg)

Irish Colonels: Michael William Burns, 73rd New York Infantry

Michael William Burns was born in Ireland in 1834. He emigrated to the United States at the age of 14, and prior to the outbreak of the Civil War worked as a city inspector and a fireman. It was his connections with the fire service that led him to raise a Company to serve in […]

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Survivors of the 69th Pennsylvania at their old position in Gettysburg in 1887

‘We Thought We Were All Gone': The 69th Pennsylvania at Gettysburg

Shortly before 9pm on 2nd July 1887 a group of Confederate veterans disembarked from their train cars at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. There to greet them were some of their former foe, nearly 500 men of the old Union Philadelphia Brigade. Illuminated under red and green lights, roman candles were fired into the night sky as the […]

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Father Corby at Gettysburg (Memoirs of Chaplain Life)

Father Corby Statue 100 Year Anniversary

A recent post told the story of Father Corby’s absolution of the Irish Brigade at Gettysburg in 1863. A statue of the chaplain was erected at the battlefield on the 29th October 1910, and will soon celebrate its 100th birthday. To commemorate the occasion the Father William Corby Division of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, […]

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Father Corby at Gettysburg (Memoirs of Chaplain Life)

Father Corby’s Gettysburg Absolution

On July 2nd 1863, 147 years ago today, the Irish Brigade of the Army of the Potomac were preparing to go into action on the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg. With the Federal Third Corps being pushed back by the Confederates, the Irish were ordered to fall in and take arms. Only minutes […]

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John Lonergan Memorial, Carrick-On-Suir, Co. Tipperary. Lonergan received the Medal of Honor for actions at Gettysburg

A Gettysburg Hero’s Irish Memorial

A recent post brought you news of the unveiling of a memorial in Carrick-On-Suir, Co. Tipperary to Captain John Lonergan who won the Medal of Honor at Gettysburg. A follow-up visit has allowed some photos of the memorial to be posted and also provides a backdrop for a more detailed look at Lonergan’s actions in […]

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