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Sergeant James Fegan, his wife and son (Philadelphia Inquirer)

‘Drop the Liftinant A Curtsey, Woman!': The Long Service of Sergeant James Fegan, 3rd US Infantry

The 29th October 1851 was a good day for the United States army. That was the date that 24-year-old Irish laborer, James Fegan, decided to enlist. He must have cut an impressive figure standing in front of Captain Westcott, a recruiting officer for the 2nd US Infantry. Towering at over 6 feet in height, Fegan […]

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The Temporary Field Hospital set up by Richard Curran behind Haystacks at Antietam (Deeds of Valor)

Medal of Honor: Assistant Surgeon Richard Curran, 33rd New York Infantry

In the late morning of 17th September 1862, the first elements of Major-General William B. Franklin’s Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac arrived on the Antietam battlefield after a forced march. The bloodiest day in United States history was already in full swing, and Franklin’s lead unit, Colonel William H. Irwin’s 3rd Brigade of the […]

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The Dunker Church on the Antietam Battlefield. The Cornfield is not far from this position (Library of Congress)

Irish Colonels: Howard Carroll, 105th New York Infantry

Over 25 Irish born officers commanded New York regiments during the American Civil War. The most well known led units in the Irish Brigade and Corcoran’s Irish Legion, but the majority of Irishmen did not serve in specific ethnic formations. Among these men was Dubliner Howard Carroll. He was appointed Colonel of the 105th New […]

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Captain Patrick Clooney Memorial Waterford

The Waterford Memorial to Captain Patrick Clooney, 88th New York, Irish Brigade

Captain Patrick Clooney of the 88th New York, Irish Brigade, was a native of Waterford. He had served with distinction in the Battalion of St. Patrick during the Papal War in 1860, and travelled to the United States in July¬†1861. He enlisted as a Private in Company K (Meagher’s Zouaves) of the 69th New York […]

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Antietam, Sharpsburg, Irish

‘Ten Feet East of a Walnut Stump': An Irishman at Sharpsburg

At 6am on the morning of 17th September 1862, Colonel Henry B. Strong and his largely Irish 6th Louisiana Volunteers were drawn up in woods slightly to the north-west of a small Dunker Church, near the town of Sharpsburg, Maryland. The regiment, which by this point in the war numbered little over a 100 men, […]

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Captain Patrick Clooney Memorial Restoration Fund

A new blog site has been established by James Doherty entitled Waterford Civil War Veterans, dedicated to exploring that county’s contribution in the American Civil War. One of the site’s main aims is to raise money for the restoration of the Captain Patrick Clooney memorial, erected shortly after his death at Ballybricken Church, near his […]

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A ‘Storm of Leaden Hail': The 63rd New York at Antietam

148 years ago today, a battle was being fought that would be remembered as the bloodiest single day in American history. Along the banks of Antietam Creek, Maryland, Union and Confederate soldiers clashed for some 12 hours. By day’s end, in the region of 22,720 men would be dead, wounded or missing. Among the troops […]

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‘Irish Molly’ at Antietam

Robert McLernon has studied the Irish Brigade for 25 years and has kindly supplied some of his research for this and some future posts. The following extracts refer to an Irish woman who followed the Brigade and most particularly the 88th New York Regiment, of which her husband was a member. As the Brigade charged […]

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