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Baby names was perhaps one of the more unlikely areas where Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis fought it out for supremacy (New York Historical Society)

A Regimental Child and the Baby Name Civil War

As newly formed regiments left their home states for the seat of war, many wives chose to accompany their men to the front. When the 37th New York ‘Irish Rifles’ settled into their duties around Washington in the summer of 1861, Private John Dooley had his family with him. Waiting in camp was his wife and […]

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Patrick O'Dea wrote to his mother money from a camp such as this in January 1863 (Winter Camp of the 16th Michigan, 1863 by Edwin Forbes, Library of Congress)

The Civil War Story of Patrick O’Dea and his ‘Beloved Mother’

In May 1861 Patrick O’Dea went to war. Leaving his home in Cattaraugus County, New York, the twenty-year old Co. Clare native left behind his widowed mother, Mary, who he was helping to support on her small holding near the town of Salamanca. Patrick enlisted for two years in the ‘Irish Rifles’, the 37th New […]

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Battle of Williamsburg, 5th May 1862 (Kurz and Allison, 1893)

‘Allow Me to Mingle My Tears': The Aftermath of a 22-Year-Old Irishman’s Death

On 5th May 1862, Kerryman Lieutenant Patrick Henry Hayes led Company G of the 37th New York ‘Irish Rifles’ into action at Williamsburg, Virginia. As they charged toward the enemy, Patrick and his men also had to contend with nature; a severe rainstorm hampered their progress through a dense pine forest, which was littered with […]

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Sgt. Thomas Fallon captures a Confederate Officer at Big Shanty, Georgia in 1864

Medal of Honor: Private Thomas T. Fallon, 37th New York Infantry

Thomas T. Fallon was born in Co. Galway on 12th August 1837. He emigrated to the United States in 1859, and just two years later found himself in the midst of the American Civil War. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K of the 37th New York ‘Irish Rifles’, beginning a wartime service that would span […]

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Hunting John Wilkes Booth: The Man Who Led the Search for Lincoln’s Killer

The night of 14th April 1865 was one that Major James Rowan O’Beirne, Provost Marshal of the District of Columbia, would never forget. President Abraham Lincoln lay dying in William Petersen’s Boarding House, having been shot by John Wilkes Booth at Ford’s Theatre. Secretary of State William Seward had been stabbed in his own home, […]

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